What are the rules? Virat Kohli’s “fake fielding” against Bangladesh might have cost India the game

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On November 2 evening at the T20 World Cup, Virat Kohli once again hit a match-winning fifty to help India overcome Bangladesh. He is now accused of unsportsmanlike behavior, though, which, had the on-field umpires witnessed it, might have led to the game’s outcome. Nurul Hasan, the wicketkeeper for Bangladesh, claims that the on-field umpires overlooked a situation in which Kohli “faked” fielding, which might have cost Bangladesh five crucial penalty runs.

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In Adelaide, it rained harder than expected during the second inning. Groundsmen quickly covered the wicket, but the outfield was already soaked. Some individuals criticized the International Cricket Council (ICC) for postponing play in India and Bangladesh while canceling the Australia vs. England game last week due to a “slippery outfield.”

In the sixth over of the game, Bangladesh opener Litton Das, who had an incredible start to the run chase, blasted a ball from Axar Patel down to deep backward point. Das was only able to make two runs before Arshdeep Singh collected the ball and lobbed it back into the striker’s end. Towards point and halfway in from Arshdeep, Kohli feigned to toss the ball at the non-striker’s end even though the ball was flying over his head from deep.

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What are the regulations?

According to Cricket Law 41.5, players are not allowed to “deliberately divert, deceive, or obstruct the batter.” The umpire has the authority to give the batting team five penalty runs and declare the ball dead if it is determined that the incident broke the rule. This rule was implemented because fielders were deliberately pretending to have the ball in order to fool the batting team and prevent them from scoring more runs.

Bangladesh would have received five penalty runs if on-field umpires Chris Brown and Marais Erasmus had thought Kohli’s actions were an attempt to purposefully mislead the batter. However, the umpires must make the choice immediately.